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Understanding of Media

Over the course of this past month, my understanding of the media and it’s capabilities has increased greatly. Prior to Covid-19 being declared a global pandemic and HWS colleges transitioning to remote learning, I knew that the impact that media has on society was powerful, but I wasn’t sure to what extent. We always hear how people today, especially my generation, spends far too much time engaging on social media and television. We see statistics about the influence media has on us and our learning, and how people are becoming less sociable as media advances. Sometimes it seems as if there are almost no limits to the things you can do and the information we can access through media. It can be overwhelming and often fascinating, which is why people may be so engaged in all it has to offer. Since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic, it seems as if everyone has been glued to their televisions, as the news is the primary source to gaining new information for many. I never really thought of watching the new as a necessity, although I always thought it was important. With new regulations and suggestions appearing daily, it is almost as if we must watch the news in order to know what is going on. As far is social life goes, I knew social media was a great way to stay connected with friends, but I never thought it could become our only means of communication with them. Danah Boyd asked teenagers prior to the pandemic, why they engage in social media. One responded with “Cuz that’s where all my friends are” (Boyd). This is even more true today. Now that we are all stuck in the house, I believe the benefits of social media are a lot clearer to see.

“Latest News.” Department of Health, coronavirus.health.ny.gov/latest-news.

Saiidi, Uptin. “Social Media Making Millennials Less Social: Study.” CNBC, CNBC, 19 Oct. 2015, http://www.cnbc.com/2015/10/15/social-media-making-millennials-less-social-study.html.

Boyd, Danah. “Why Youth Heart Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life.” 2017, doi:10.31219/osf.io/22hq2.

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